Senior Alexa Correia channels traditional surrealism in her artwork

Alexa+Correia%2C+a+senior+at+Marjory+Stoneman+Douglas+High+School%2C+draws+her+passion+for+surrealism+with+gothic+figures+and+traditional+mediums.+Artists+like+Aya+Takano+influenced+Correia+to+develop+similar+styles.+Photo+by+Alexa+Correia

Alexa Correia, a senior at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, draws her passion for surrealism with gothic figures and traditional mediums. Artists like Aya Takano influenced Correia to develop similar styles. Photo by Alexa Correia

Trista Mungal, Writer

Alexa Correia, a senior at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, displays her creative talent through the sketches of traditional art forms. Throughout her life she has developed her taste towards art, establishing an all-rounded style ranging from creepy to cute.

In her youth, Correia became hooked on art through Japanese animation and Japanese comics. Comics like ‘Parasyte: The Maxim,’ ‘Vagabond,’ and ‘Berserk,’ pushed Correia in the direction of artistry. She continues to watch her favorite movies––such as Bram Stroker’s ‘Dracula’ or Confessions––, finding inspiration within the scenes. 

For as long as she could remember, Correia’s mother has been her number one supporter, constantly pushing her towards art. However, support for her art extends outside of her house, as countless teachers have praised her work and influenced her as an artist.

“Besides my mom, I’ve had support from an old teacher I had in the first grade, [named] Ms. Bennett,” Correia said. “She’s one of the main people I think of when I remember the people that pushed me.”

Correia was encouraged to pursue art in sixth grade, as her substitute science teacher gifted her expensive color pencils after being caught drawing in class. 

As a senior, Correia looks up to Randee Lombard and Jacquelene Liberman, who are both art teachers at MSD. Correia also looks to professional artists for advice, using their words for improvement. When it comes down to her art, Correia prefers using her hands rather than a digital pen. 

“I do [a lot] of traditional art,” Correia said. “I’m mostly using charcoal, pens, and neutral color pencils. I rarely use colors.” 

Some of Correia’s favorite kinds of mediums are usually creepy pieces that feature cute things such as dolls or fairies. She began to accept this style when she grew out of her tomboy phase around the fifth grade. She always enjoyed creepy styles, however still wanted to stay in brand with being boyish.

“I just got over it one day and [now] cute things are openly my favorite,” Correia said.

Correia’s biggest inspiration for this art style is Aya Takano. Takano is a superflat––a style dedicated to the lack of depth, three-dimensionality, and flat colors––artist based in Saitama, Japan known for her Edo period-centered art to her impressionism. When Correia first got into the surrealism scene, Takano stood out to her, especially her “Ocean Blue” piece. 

For quite some time, Correia wanted to delve into this art but hasn’t developed a style to do so. With a more personal style, Correia believes she will be able to find a technique that suits her and feels comfortable. 

Other than drawing, Correia enjoys watching anime or classic movies, listening to music and practicing tattooing on fake skin. 

Correia considers pursuing a career in art as one of her major goals. Although her dream school, Cornish College of Arts in Washington State, does not offer full scholarships and Correia is only able to attend schools in Florida through the Bright Future program, she plans on applying in her last year of college. 

Samples of her artwork:

Alexa Correia, a senior at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, draws her passion for surrealism with gothic figures and traditional mediums. Artists like Aya Takano influenced Correia to develop similar styles. Photo by Alexa Correia