Intermittent fasting is a scheduled eating process; the people who participate in fasting have a set time period when they eat, normally 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Photo+illustration+by+Mackenzie+Quinn

Photo illustration by Mackenzie Quinn

Mackenzie Quinn

A study at Harvard University has tested intermediate fasting on rats. The results show lower cholesterol levels and blood pressure. While people can experience those positive side effects, they may also lose sleep, muscles and nutrients. 

Gin Stephens’ book “Delay, Don’t Deny: Living an Intermittent Fasting Lifestyle” starts with a foreword from Dr. Kenneth Power and a disclaimer to seek medical advice before starting any official diets.

“Intermittent fasting claims to help the body burn fat in an efficient way, but this has not been proven,” Rasabi said. “The main reason individuals see weight loss with this eating pattern is because they are eating overall less calories throughout the day, due to the fasting windows required in this diet.” Story by Mackenzie Quinn

This story was originally published in the March 2021 Eagle Eye print edition.

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